Dogs Retired by Breeders & Auctions – What should we do to make this situation better?

Dogs Retired by Breeders & Auctions  

What should we do to make this situation better?

By Ron Sturgeon

Not in any order, the problems:

  • Breeders are done with these dogs and aren’t shy about disposing of them.
  • Generally, we don’t want them to be used as breeding stock again.
  • Breeders want money and are unlikely to give retired dogs away to appease animal welfare groups
  • Many of these retired dogs are sick or disabled. They need veterinary care.
  • The current auction model has created a situation on a nationwide level where the dogs are overvalued and breeders take advantage of it.
  • In some cases, the dogs are traumatized or have not been socialized. Selling through existing channels is neither realistic nor the right solution for the dogs.
  • We need a solution that does not inadvertently make the issues worse by pushing them into a darker corner where dogs are sold for medical research or dumped on the side of a road.
  • A retired breeding dog requires food, medical care, etc., so a commercial breeder may have no incentive to keep dogs that drain their bottom line.
  • Options for these retired dogs are euthanasia or to be sold to research labs.
  • There is likely no funding available to help with this problem.

In keeping with my usual paradigm, I want the proposed solution to

  • Be as simple as possible
  • Use as many existing resources as possible
  • Minimize the need for additional funding
  • Be scalable to accommodate large numbers of retired dogs
  • Be realistic about the legitimate need for breeders to retire dogs
  • Be fair to breeders by giving them reasonable compensation for retired dogs, and a tax deduction in certain cases, and it must be doable, even if it does not please everyone.

As with our approach for reform of the breeding industry, our approach to auctions should be easy to understand and fair to all stakeholders.

Here is my proposal:

Any breeder who retires more than 6 dogs annually, with a change in ownership should be required to release retired dogs to:

  1. Rescue groups that are registered as non-profits (pricing, if any, negotiated privately)
  2. Rehabilitative groups, such as senior dogs for vets, PTSD therapy, etc. (pricing, if any, negotiated privately)
  3. Public, government-owned no-kill shelters
  4. Private sale, not to exceed one in any month, as they see fit, at any terms they want.
  5. Private sale(more than one per month), trade or auction (where allowed by law) with the following requirements:
    1. A licensed veterinarian must examine all dogs and issue a certificate of health issued that includes all known issues with the dog.
    2. Prior to sale, all dogs must be spayed or neutered by a licensed veterinarian. All dogs must be chipped and registered in a data base.
    3. The maximum sale price for any retired dog sold privately or at auction is $650.00.
    4. If traded, the value shall not exceed $650 per dog.
    5. A $25 per dog auction fee would be collected and paid to regulatory agency to fund oversight and enforcement.

All senior dogs changing hands should be kept in a log by the breeder for future reporting or compliance for a period of 5 years, the log shall contain the information necessary to regulate and enforce such regulations.

Only licensed veterinarians should euthanize dogs and only after the veterinarian has examined the dog and determined that it should be put down for medical or behavioral reasons.

I believe this proposal would be better than what is in place now. It is a reasonable way to address the issue of dogs retired from breeding stock.

This article written by Ron Sturgeon Sr VP and Founder of Reform Canine Breeders and Auctions

 

Comments(3)

  1. Jen Roberts says

    Thank you, this is definitely on the right path and far better than it stands today. I support this.

  2. Kim Preskitt says

    Ron, you are right on the money! Thank you for heading up this mission!

  3. lucy lilly says

    Personally any mill dog abused and mistreated the owner should be fined nite rewarded..

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